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  Trip Report: Chasing the CEBX 800 - Chapter 1
  Part I
Special CEBX 800 Move - Nothing else like it in the world!
  From: Chasing the CEBX 800 Dates: Apr 9, 2005 Author: Nathan Holmes


Photo 1
First sighting of the J-PTRDEN1-28, just north of the Beshoar siding (southeast of Trinidad, CO) on BNSF's Twin Peaks Subdivision (ex-Fort Worth and Denver trackage)
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Photo 2
Coming down around the hill out of Beshoar and over an unnamed dirt road...
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Photo 3
The load in question... when you're on the ground beside it, it's ENORMOUS.
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Photo 4
Bringing up the rear is KRL 074, one of two cabooses on the train. The guy hanging off the side is just observing the load around the corner
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Photo 5
A couple miles down the line, the load passes over the bridge on the north side of Trinidad, CO, spanning the ex-Santa Fe Raton mainline.
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Photo 6
Initially I thought I'd hate the new BNSF look, but I find this new GE ES44DC quite stunning. BNSF 7687 is, to my knowledge, the first new-logo unit to enter Colorado, and is itself is only about a month old.
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Photo 7
I assumed the load was headed up to Denver via Pueblo and Walsenburg, but that notion was quickly dispelled by a local BNSF employee. They were going to back the move onto the Raton line and get to Pueblo via La Junta in order to avoid clearance problems on the Trinidad-Pueblo direct route. Lots of people are gathered around to watch the move.
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Photo 8
Come on back - slow! Everybody stands around, watching and wondering if this crossing signal is going to have to come out.
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Photo 9
Unlike the switch stand back at the entrance to the connector track down to the Raton main, turns out this crossing signal only needs a little encouragement by some BNSF employees in order to squeeze the Schnabel car by it.
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Photo 10
Trailing behind the locomotive is a KRL flat with spare parts for the behemoth.
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Photo 11
Here's that enormous car again, being backed down the connector track towards Trinidad proper
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Photo 12
A rear view of BNSF 7687 - notice that low-mounted rear headlight. That's just weird... Perfect level to burn yourself as you go by, it'd seem.
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Photo 13
The whole enchilada, backing up very slowly (probably only 1-2 mph)
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Photo 14
At the bottom of the connector is an extremely tight curve to negotiate. Several crossbucks were removed, and the derail switch stand was removed (seen on the ground) in order to get this thing by. There's a UP crane-type truck following the movement to remove and reinstall this sort of thing.
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Photo 15
The best part of this car is that there are two operators that can hydraulically offset the load in relation to the car.
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Photo 16
And offset they do! Note that the entire load is shifted left of where it would normally be. This apparently allows them to better work around tight curves and online obstacles.
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Photo 17
Backing under the US 160/350 bridge and onto the BNSF's Raton Subdivision.
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Creative Commons License This work is copyright 2005 by Nathan D. Holmes (maverick@drgw.net), but licensed under a Creative Commons License. This allows and encourages others to copy, modify, use, and distribute my work, without the hassle of asking me for explicit permission or fear of copyright violation. I encourage others to consider CC or other Open Content-style licensing of their original works.

All photographs in this trip report were taken with a Canon EOS 10D using either a Canon 28-105mm USM or a Canon 75-300mm f4-5.3 IS/USM.